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Scientists Call For Change In The Next Generation Of Modern Medicine

Scientists Call For Change In The Next Generation Of Modern Medicine

Published: 20-Nov-2020 | Published By: Market Research Store

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai(ISMMS)disclosed that genomic information extracted from population biobanks globally comprise much less ethnic assortment than needed. Out of almost 5 Million samples of DNA at biobanks universally, 68% come from people of European ancestry. This absence of diversity restricts scientists’capability to find link between genetic variants and disease, and also contributes to extending ethnic differences in health care, eventually preventing diminished minorities from promoting the outcomes of personalized medicine. The researchers have published their study in the journal Cell.

Personalized medicine defines the flourishing medical model in which doctors utilize genomics and other progressive tools to find out the best approach to care for each distinct patient. This prototype stands in stark difference to traditional medicine, which factuallyuses a one-size-fits-all method, mostlyproviding the similar treatment to each patient. In 2003, sequencing of the first human genome was completedand the countrywide adoption of electronic health records(EHRs) started in 2004, setting the stage for modified medicine, as the incorporation of clinical and genomic data helped doctors in the prevention, prediction, and treatment of disease. Presently, over 95% of the U.S. hospitals uses EHR technology and loads of human DNA samples sequencing has been completed.

Lately, the ISMMS was in news as its scientistsfound that kidney disease gene impacts more populations than earlier thought. A team of scientists at the ISMMS along with the University of Colorado and Stanford University, havefound that kidney disease jeopardy variants of the gene APOL1—formerly known to impact African and African American inhabitants—are also discovered at significant frequencies in Latin American and Caribbean populations. APOL1 gene impacts on these populations arepresently unknown. The study was published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

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https://www.marketresearchstore.com/report/global-alternative-medicine-market-report-2020-industry-analysis-752803